Mail Icon CONTACT

Choose the Right Test

It is important to choose the correct test method based on the application. It is good practice to plan to use the highest test force in order to obtain the largest possible indentation, whilst still adhereing to the requirements of the specific standard.

A difficult job on one tester could be very simple and fast on another!

Note:

This page is only intended as a rough guide.

To receive recommendations tailored to your needs, please contact us to discuss your requirements with our expert sales personnel.

Rockwell

Advantages Disadvantages
Quick test cycle Component support is critical to result.
(Try a portable instead)
Instantaneous hardness result Not suitable for specimens or thin hardened layers.
(Try Vickers instead)
Possibility of automation
No optical measurement device required - cost effective
Negligable operator influence on test result.

Vickers

Advantages Disadvantages
Almost no limit to the specimen hardness. Time consuming to achieve sufficient surface quality.
(Try Rockwell instead)
Test on thin sheet metal, small specimens or test areas, thin walled tubes, thin hardness layers, galvanic layers. Time required to measure diagonal length.
(Try upgrading to an automatic measuring system, e.g. ZHμ.HD)
Small indentation. Hardness result can be influenced by quality of surface finish.
(Try Rockwell instead)
No change in hardness with a change in test force. Operator influence on the hardness value.
(Try upgrading to an automatic measuring system, e.g. ZHμ.HD)
No change of hardness if component moves in direction of test force.

Brinell

Advantages Disadvantages
Suitable for tests on inhomogeneous materials. Limited hardness capability upto 650 HBW.
(Try Vickers instead)
Suitable for tests on large unfinished parts such as forged, cast, hot rolled, pressed and heat treated parts. Unsuitable for testing small and thin specimens.
(Try Vickers instead)
Simple and robust indenter. Time consuming to prepare surface and measure indentation.
(Try Rockwell instead)
Relatively large degree of damage to the specimen by the indentation.
(Try Vickers instead)